East London rental information

East London has a population of 504,584 which means it is ranked 7 out of 8 Rentonomy compass zones (1 being the most populous).

  • The most populous area is East Ham (E6)
  • Houses account for 72.7% of housing
  • 14.3% of inhabitants in East London were not born in the UK

East London contains 16 Rentonomy areas. The most populous area in East London is East Ham (E6) with a population of 65,492. The least populous area is Gidea Park (RM2) with a population of 11,623. Average rents, based on a 2 bedroom property, range from £224 in Plaistow to £185 in Rainham. Average crime (per thousand people) here is 27.5 which is 4% above the London average. We give the wealth score in the area a Rentonomy rating of 3.13 out of 5 (1 being the wealthiest) which is 47% below the London average. The average age in this area is 36.19 which is 2.6% above the London average. The three areas which best exemplify East London are Plaistow, Romford and Harold Wood

Plaistow is home to Premier League side West Ham

Plaistow in east London is a fairly run down inner east London district. The area is very residential and dominated by large social housing estates. In January 2013 a substantial new housing development of both private and affordable homes was approved on the sight of the old Plaistow Hospital and construction is now complete. Plaistow is home to Premier League side West Ham. It is well connected with two stations on the District and Hammersmith & City lines which run into Tower Hill in the City in just under 20 minutes.

Romford is a large urban hub in north east London. For most of its history it was a market town in Essex but was incorporated into London in 1965. Like a lot of the periphery of London the arrival of the railway in the 1830's really kicked off development and the town shifted from agriculture to light industry and in the last few decades to retail and commerce. Over the course of the twentieth century, Romford expanded exponentially in population and became a municipal borough in between the wars. It now forms one of the largest commercial, retail, entertainment and leisure districts outside of the centre of London and has a developed night time economy.

Harold Wood is a district in outer London very close to the boundary with Essex. The area is named after the very same King Harold who received an arrow in the eye at the Battle of Hastings. The area is pretty well connected by transport, having its own junction worth the M25 orbital motorway and a train station which runs into Liverpool Street in about 40 minutes. The area has a few interesting things going on, most notably the new Crossrail Station that will open in 2017. It'll take commuters right into Bond street in the same time it currently takes them to get to Liverpool Street, so a small but meaningful change in commute. Connected to this is the massive development of nearly 500 homes on the former site of Harold Wood Hospital which will significantly intensify the feel of the area.

The most common country of origin (excluding the UK) is India

We give pubs in the area a Rentonomy rating of 2.9 which is 35.3% below the London average. We give coffee shops in the area a Rentonomy rating of 3.1 which is 31.5% below the London average. We give restaurants in the area a Rentonomy rating of 2.7 which is 41.2% below the London average. We give the quality of the retails shops in the area a Rentonomy rating of 3.6 which is 21% below the London average.

14.3% of locals in East London were not born in the UK ranking it 9 out of 8 Rentonomy compass areas as most international area of London, North West London being the most international at number 1. The most common country of origin (excluding the UK) is India, followed by Pakistan and Republic of Ireland. In terms of languages spoken, the most common language spoken in homes in this area (except English) is Bengali (with Sylheti and Chatgaya) followed by Urdu and Lithuanian.

17.2% of homes in the area are rented privately while 57.8% are owner occupied and 23.1% are social rented. For those interested in types of housing, flats account for 27.3% of homes in the area while houses account for 72.7%. Of these houses, terraces represent 36.4% of the total, semi-detached 28.2% and detached 7.9%.

When it comes to employment, the average job grade here is 4.9 (1 being the fanciest professional jobs and 10 being the more menial jobs, as defined by the Office for National Statistics) meaning residents of East London are ranked 9 out of 8 Rentonomy compass zones for average job grade, 1 being the area with the highest grade of workers. The most common field of employment here is Lower managerial, administrative and professional occupations which employs 17.1% of the population.


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